Two Brewers – Classic Cask Strength Single Malt

The Two Brewers Cask Strength Single Malt was the first up in our tasting last Friday and representing our Canadian choice for the evening. At first sip it was received rather controversially across the room but as everyone dove into their second and third tries, this northern charmer started to win over some hearts. From expressions of perplexity turning to eyes assentingly looking to one another bringing a collective sigh of relive. It is unspoken but you can tell the prideful Canadian inside us all really wants our home country picks to succeed and stand up against the greats from around the world so its always nice when it comes to fruition like it had.

Two Brewers Whisky , distilled by a couple gentleman up in Whitehorse, Yukon who began their path brewing beer have now managed to put themselves on the map within the world of whisky. Although the climate up north there is not ideal for aging whisky Bob and Alan continue to maintain enough innovative forethought and unique fermentation techniques to consistently produce a good quality juice.

This particular release like the all their others is a limited one and Two Brewer’s first Cask Strength expression.

ABV – 58% / Age – 7-8 years / Mash – 100% Malted Barley / Region – Canada (Yukon) / Cask – New Oak

NOSE – A little rough and tumble on the nose which kind of stood in front of the sweetness which I would of liked more of. Trailing that initial youthfulness though was some nice hints of vanilla, malt and oily leather similar to the inside of a ball glove.

PALATE – Like I mentioned earlier, the palate for most of us really started to open up on the second and third sip. Very viscous on the tongue but displaying a nice salty sweetness once it rested the palate. As it hits the roof of your mouth, a peppery spiciness and more leather finishes it off. On the third go around most of us added a couple drops of water which really brought those sweet qualities to the top of the taste buds with notes of apple, toffee and vanilla while lessening the pepperiness.

Finish – A subtle sweetness slightly lingers before the peppery spice completely takes over. Medium in length but sits more at the roof of your mouth versus the back of your throat.

Adolescent in nature, this whisky was just less polished than those single malt scotches in its price range. Overall a decent pour though which has me rather excited to try some of Two Brewer’s other stuff.

My rating – 7.2 / 10

Member rating – 7.3 / 10

  • Review by Steven Shaw
https://twobrewerswhisky.com/

Eau Claire – Single Malt Whisky

With Batch 01 come and gone, Batch 02 of the first barrel aged single malt whisky in Alberta’s modern history was released in limited quantities just before Christmas along side the familiar signs of “only one bottle per customer” just to make sure the love is spread as far as possible throughout the local markets. This is very exciting for an Alberta born whisky man like myself and I have no doubt the community around me feels the same. Eau Claire Distillery who has already received international accolades for there spirit releases have demonstrated the same dedication to quality and workmanship into producing their single malt, made of 100% Alberta grown barley from the soils of the Turner Valley area. Southern Alberta is world renowned for producing some of the best barley and rye in the world which is why scotch makers purchase it for their own distillery’s, so as Eau Claire has so plainly put, “it is only natural that we turn that agricultural gold into fine whiskies.” Makes sense to me!

ABV – 43% / Age – 3~ years / Mash – 100% Malted Barley / Region – Canada (Alberta) / Cask – New Oak

Displayed humbly on their label is the use of a hand plow which I assume is to foreshadow their farming methods. There may be many variations of their motto, “From farm to glass” used by several distillers but Eau Claire uniquely embodies and encapsulates their beliefs and the true definition of what they stand for by that message. More specifically, for their rye and single malt whisky’s, Eau Claire’s farming operations actually use traditional horse farming methods to plant and harvest the grain. That my friend, is a true artisanal and organic approach to manufacturing, and whether its necessary or not, it is those kinds of efforts and ethics I can ride the bandwagon for.

NOSE – Hints of cheese, avocado and malt aromas near the start for me but quickly blossoms into floral and citrus with a subtlety of unripe banana and apple. The nose rounds off fairly nicely and comes together a little more the second time around with more of the sweetness and smell of alcohol coming through.

PALATE – The malt and fruity notes present themselves eagerly from the first drop with entries of vanilla, honey, butterripple and a trace of humus which gives a buttery or waxy like mouth feel. Overall, smoother and more flavourful than I expected finishing off creamy and citrusy but with a hint of banana again which my palate usually pulls out in younger whisky’s. A little more hearty oak influence will go a mile with its already good flavour profile.

FINISH – Light and gentle finish with a caressing sweetness and spice that linger on the back of the tongue.

Eau Claire’s passionate approach is clearly evident in this whisky they have created. From the nose to the finish, this single malt punches way above its weight class in every way. It takes real innovation and forethought to stand among the good single malts of the world, especially as a young three year old Canadian but in my eyes they have introduced themselves to the conversation and left behind a lasting impression. Reaching recognition is the hard part but they still have some road to travel. Some age will do wonders for this whisky helping it mature and balance the adolescence establishing it’s current ceiling.

My rating, which may be a little biased due to my desire for a local distiller like Eau Claire to succeed, is a 7.9/10.

  • Review by Steven Shaw

Gooderham & Worts – Eleven Souls

Peace Bridge, Calgary, Alberta

An inspiring release from Gooderham and Wort embodying the story of William Gooderham’s humanitarian act of caring for eleven orphans during their voyage to Canada. Part of the 2018 Northern Border Collection Rare releases Corby brings to us an intricate and very satisfying Canadian Whisky. They have some how managed to blend a composition of Brasetto Rye, Rye, Rye Malt, Red Winter Wheat, Barley, Barley Malt and double distilled Corn all marrying together to create a symphony of flavor.

ABV – 49% / Age – Blend of Casks / Mash – Wheat, Rye, Barley, Corn / Region – Canada (Ontario) / Cask – ex-Bourbon & New Oak

They have found a way to showcase the most desirable attribute of each grain, full in both body and flavour every step of the way.

NOSE – On the nose I get a spicy barbecued sweet corn, high-rye bourbon like scent similar to an Old Grand Dad or Basil Hayden’s. It’s a strong aroma finishing off with raisins, plums and some floral like notes. It presents itself a little differently each time it passes you nose though making it kind of hard to pin point some of its character.

PALATE – Less elusive than the nose, the palate’s complexity establishes itself with big flavour profiles from buttered Russian rye bread, rich oak and dark fruits to a pleasant finish of typical rye like baking spices and a coffee and cream like mouth feel.

FINISH – Along with those delicious creamy rye spices, was some bitter dried fruit, and a subtle sweetness resembling an almost honey nut cheerio (sweet, vanilla, and grainy) like presence.  

This pour is artfully ingenious and perfectly represents the creativity and innovation taking place in the world of whisky today. The second time around I put a couple drops of water in which opened it up quite nicely without disturbing the rye too much. I am not usually a fan of adding water but this particular whisky takes it pretty well. Very impressed all around and looking forward to try the rest of the 2018 collection from Corby. I just hope that Gooderham & Worts gets the recognition they deserve globally for this release.

RATING – 9.2/10

  • Review by Steven Shaw

Lot 40 – 11 Year Cask Strength

Nestled in the cold Alberta plains where rye is born, the next bottle to make our tasting line up is a Canadian masterpiece, Lot 40 Cask Strength, aged 11 years. This limited release cask strength is quintessentially Canadian and has become the country’s darling within the whiskey community. The 100% Rye, aged in new oak is once again receiving the highest of praise across the country and internationally. It’s 2017 predecessor is almost impossible to find only a year later and I can only assume this bottle will follow suit. Snag one while you can before its too late. I can’t stress enough how important it is to have a few home grown beauties like this on the shelf to demonstrate some nationalistic pride. Canada still occasionally punches in a high weight class but never seems to get the attention it deserves in the whisky community.

ABV – 58.4% / Age -11 years / Mash – 100% Rye / Region – Canada / Cask – New Oak

With Scotch and Bourbon as kings, Rye whisky seems to patiently sit in the back seat waiting for its opportunity to shine. Problem is though, there is a lot of rye out there that’s kind of flat and boring outside of their typical spiciness. This particular release by Lot 40 though is so full of flavour and wonderfully well crafted that once you have warmed up your palate with a couple sips and ease past the cask strength rye spice, your tongue will roll with pleasure.

NOSE – A big bold portrayal of its flavour bursting with overwhelming rye spices with hints of apple, butterscotch, and a slight smokiness.

PALATE – The spicy boldness increases as the aromas transition to a savory blend of cinnamon, vanilla, pepper and a strong oak influence emphasizing the strength of this expression.

FINISH – Leaving a lasting impression, the high proof is quite evident. The palate carries itself through the finish with less spice and a very slight trace of menthol as it dries out before finally fading out.

This whisky will not be for everyone and will impress the connoisseur more than the casual carouser. Cask Strength whiskies can be a lot to endure and this rye is one of the more boldest I have tried. Spicier and stronger than it’s 12 year predecessor that was bottled in 2016, the 2018 release is still something pretty special so I am looking forward to the continuation on this series. My personal rating was 8.5/10.

Ratings varied across the group for this one which was kind of expected. With a heavy scotch influence among the boys, not many of them frequent a bottle of good rye. Collective rating for the bottle is 7.3/10.

  • Review by Steven Shaw